Elon Musk had a good 2018, at least in retrospect. Coming out of production hell, Tesla’s Model 3 is now the #1 selling car in the USA by revenue, along with various other signifiers that Tesla is now a real, high-volume car manufacturer. Tesla itself declared a $300 million USD profit for Q3, delighting the stock market and its investors, if not the many shorters who continue to lose money and credibility.
Not the best bike but good for what it is. 250watt. not enough power even for small hills on its own and does not do 15/hr even on flat ground. battery looses power when cold but still works. Over all so far, dispite the above I give it 4 stars because it is what you would excpect in a cheap bike and it does work. There is no braket for the headlight tho so be warned you will have to improvise on that.
The sub has been awesome in giving me confidence, I got a Giant XTC from CL. and was going to order all the parts from Luna's Black Friday Sale. A couple of questions, I will have a bike shop remove the bottom bracket, but I am assuming the Bafang 750 with the 17 AH battery should be an easy install at that point (or is it)? I am thinking of having the bike shop install the motor too and I do the the rest. besides a pedal crank, Allen wrenches etc, what tools will I need? Any top rated videos to watch? Is the speed sensor worth it? What about the half twist vs. full twist vs thumb throttle? Color display,, etc. Since the bike has a 10-speed cassette, will that be good or bad (me thinks good). Any other thoughts or pointers? Should I order the stuff from Aliexpress or Ebay?
It’s hard to ignore the growing popularity of electric bikes. Commuters and hybrid riders have already embraced the technology, but what about when it comes to mountain shredders? MTB fans are certainly beginning to realise the benefits of electric – an electric mountain bike can give you all the thrills you want from a normal MTB but with the extra power you need to get back to the top and give the trail another go.
If you really want to see the future take a look at the Fazua Evation, with a battery and motor this system weighs an incredible 4.7kg! The battery only has 250wh, but at 1.3kg you could easily carry a spare in a pack. The really interesting thing about this system though, is the motor and the battery can be removed from the frame, so you really do have two bikes in one.
The Allez range shows off the capabilities of aluminum, from Win Tunnel-tuned and ultra-stiff race rockets to fully capable all-rounders that serve as the perfect introduction to road riding. Our engineers have decades of experience with alloy, developing innovative welding and hydroforming techniques that allow them to craft the ideal balance of responsiveness, comfort, and handling.
Direct-to-consumer Italian brand Thok’s MIG bike has reviewers falling at its feet. Why? It simply offers a superb package – its geometry and construction are as on-the-ball as its choice of Shimano motor, battery placement – giving low centre of gravity – and quality build kit. At under £4k, the MIG is great value too (there is also a pricier MIG R, featuring upgraded components). Thok knows its stuff, which is hardly surprising when you look at its founder. Former champion downhill racer Stefano Migliorini understands what makes a good bike, and he personally leads the charge on bike development at Thok.
Every major bike manufacturer—and literally dozens of smaller ones—is already in the e-bike game. Car companies aren’t far behind. Ford is already bankrolling an electric bike-share system in San Francisco, and plenty of others are eyeing up the e-bike market. “The car business is jumping in with both feet,” Benjamin says, “because they realize that cars in high-density urban areas, where more than half the human race lives, just aren’t working anymore.” With big transportation players like Uber looking into e-bikes, and cities searching for ways to relieve traffic congestion, programs may only continue to expand.
Procycling brings you the colour, action and drama of the world's most spectacular sport in a glossy and dynamic magazine. It's the authoritative, worldwide voice of international professional road racing, distributed in every country where there are English-speaking fans. With exclusive features and spectacular photography, Procycling brings to life the complexities, rivalries and hardships of the European professional scene.
Whether you're riding in the backcountry or racing enduro, you need a bike that's capable and efficient. After all, to ride 'all mountain' necessitates riding the entire mountain. That's why our Enduro line of all mountain bikes, both in 650b and 29er options, come equipped with loads of travel, lightweight constructions, and geometries that can handle themselves on anything from downhill tracks to stomach-wrenching climbs.
After 2 months of online research and talking to people that owned e-bikes I walked into the Glendale, Arizona Pedego store. I met the owners Sherry and Steve. They suggested I try the Ridge Rider as it might be a fit for me. I test rode it for about 45 minutes to an hour and was somewhat convinced this could be the bike for me. I went home and did more research on the Ridge Rider. After careful thought I decided to purchase one the next day. Since then Steve, the owner, has worked with me to personalize my bike so that it is as comfortable on the trails as it is on the road. I cannot say enough about the after sale experience I have received from Sherry and Steve. I would recommend them and their store to anyone interested in an e-bike.

If you haven’t ridden or even seen a modern eMTB, here is what I have discovered. They are sturdy rigs that come standard with quality mountain bike components including beefy forks and rear suspension systems, strong disk brakes, and a reliable drivetrain. They are heavy but not that far out of the old downhill bike weight class. The distinguishing “e” features are the electric motor at the bottom bracket (some have hub motors), the battery pack, and the handlebar-mounted computer that controls the system. They have adjustable assist modes: off, low (barely helps), medium, and the battery-draining high mode. When everything is put together, they are something to behold.
Stop and go with care. Because you’re heavier and faster, it will take longer to slow down and stop. Squeeze your brakes well ahead of intersections. Remember that the bike will accelerate faster than normal, so don’t start pulling out into traffic until it’s fully clear. Also, because the bike has some heft, you may feel wobbly the first few times you get going or slow to a stop. Practice mounting, dismounting, and stopping in safe places before hitting heavily trafficked roads.
When all was said and done, the Commencal Meta Power Race 650B+ proved to have everyone's favorite e-bike controls. Commencal uses the Shimano Steps E8000 motor and system which features ergonomic thumb shifters, a small but easy to read digital display and a secure and straightforward charging connection. The ergonomic shifter of the Shimano system is better than the electronic buttons found on both the Specialized, HaiBike and Trek. The Commencal's best-in-the-test digital display also proved to be a favorite for its small size and out of the way mounting location, easy to read at-a-glance information, and color-coded support settings information. The HaiBike's Yamaha PW-X motor and system also featured a digital display, but testers thought it was a little too big, displayed too much information, was more challenging to read, and generally felt a little more clunky and less refined than the Shimano system. That Trek Powerfly's Bosch Purion shifter and display unit was easy to read and had a bright screen, but was in a less visible location on the left side of the handlebar. Our Editor's Choice Award winner, the Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fattie scored the lowest in this rating due to the lack of a handlebar mounted display and a less user-friendly charging connection.

I know that this topic is new and still contentious, but the community needs to be talking about it because it isn’t going away. The weather up here in Seattle is rainy and cold (no surprise there), so I haven’t ridden my new eBike except around the block to make sure it worked. I can’t wait to hit the trails (legally or illegally). Expect a follow up comparing the eMTB to my other mountain bikes both in how it performs and the feeling I get from riding it. I never thought I would be riding an eMTB, so trust me, I won’t hold back.
Direct-to-consumer Italian brand Thok’s MIG bike has reviewers falling at its feet. Why? It simply offers a superb package – its geometry and construction are as on-the-ball as its choice of Shimano motor, battery placement – giving low centre of gravity – and quality build kit. At under £4k, the MIG is great value too (there is also a pricier MIG R, featuring upgraded components). Thok knows its stuff, which is hardly surprising when you look at its founder. Former champion downhill racer Stefano Migliorini understands what makes a good bike, and he personally leads the charge on bike development at Thok.
Some power-on-demand only e-bikes can hardly be confused with, let alone categorised as, bicycles. For example, the Noped is a term used by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario for e-bikes which do not have pedals or in which the pedals have been removed from their motorised bicycle. These are better categorised as electric mopeds or electric motorcycles.
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