A letter from Casey Evans to Electric Bike Technologies, makers of the E-BikeKit™ electric bike conversion kit system. This one of kind adaptive electric stroller was designed by students from California State University-Sacramento using two 500w direct-drive hub motors controlled by a single E-BikeKit system. Thank you for enabling me to take my daughter hiking! My name is Casey Evans and my daughter, Montel, was born with a very rare...
The Brose motor puts out 250 watts nominally, and can peak up to a max of 460 watts. That’s around half what the 2016 Specialized Turbo S road bike we tested last year develops, but that bike’s much-larger motor sits in the rear hub, which would massively compromise performance on a full-suspension mountain bike like this one. Spend up to the Expert or S-Works spec Turbo Levo and you get a motor that can peak up to 530 watts. 
While in many areas of the country you are allowed to drive mountain electric bikes in urban settings, some local jurisdictions may limit their use as some models reach 28mph exceeding the on road accepted limit of 20mph.  So before you purchase one of these bikes, make sure to check the local laws in your given area.  These bikes are good for many different age groups including teens and adults.

I took my new Pedego Ridge Rider for my first ride today – a 25 mile single track trail. I have been riding all my life and knee pain ended my daily club rides one year after retiring. My Ridge Rider makes me feel like a Titan! I have a mountain bike that was more expensive than the Ridge Rider and I must say that the Ridge Rider rivals or exceeds the quality and ride “feel” on my non-electric mountain bike (which I can no longer ride due to the extreme pain it creates on my knee). The Ridge Rider provided 100% joy and 0% pain. What can be better! The Ridge Rider is a no compromise bike with great running gear and amazing battery life. I rode 13 miles on assist level 3 and about 12 miles on assist level 4 and made it home with 15% battery life even though the temperature was about 43 degrees F. This is the best purchase I have ever made. I second all the other reviews. This is a fabulous bike supported by a fabulous manufacturer. I can’t give enough praise to Fitness Central in Schnecksville, PA. The owner and staff gave me better advice and attention than I could have hoped for. Thanks to one and all!
On the 8.0 specifically, Haibike sets you up with the brand new Yamaha PW-X motor. This motor comes standard with a 500 watt hour battery, Bluetooth connectivity, and 80 nm of torque out the gate. The PW-X also boasts the benefit of a dual chainring up front. This means you’ll save some battery if you’re willing to work a little harder and use those gears! Speaking of gears, you’ll get a Shimano Deore XT drivetrain. Pair that with Fox 34 Float Performance front suspension and a Fox Float DPS rear shock (150mm travel) and you’ve got a fully-capable, all-around ride.
What is a road bike? A machine? A tool? Or is it a continuation of the body—a paintbrush completing a picture of your true self? We believe it's more than this, as words can't describe the feeling it gives you to ride, nor can they encapsulate the dedication behind our innovative designs. It requires years in the Win Tunnel, on the road, and in the lab perfecting aero and carbon, and it's worth every drop of sweat to deliver you the perfect ride.
I used to mountain bike quite a lot. I was a fairly strong 17 stone (238lb) weightlifter and rode pretty fast but didn't go in for big air or jumps. Nevertheless I used to break bikes at a ridiculous rate. I broke the bottom bracket off a Marin titanium frame, I broke the bottom bracket off of a Roberts hand built mountain bike. I snapped 2 pairs of handlebars, broke cranks, pedals, chains, wheels, spokes and forks etc etc.

For many bikes, battery range is more important that total power (because they're all pretty powerful). You want a bike that delivers a range long enough for your rides at the power levels you want. Most e-bikes will have three to five levels of assist kicking in anywhere from 25 percent of you pedal power to 200 percent boost. Consider how fast the battery takes to recharge, especially if you'll be using your bike for long commutes.
E-bikes remain a subject of controversy in mountain biking circles. You may not be able to take one on your favorite singletrack right now, as most non-motorized trails prohibit them. However, things have been tilting in a more permissive direction. Most recently, IMBA, the sport’s largest public advocacy group, shifted its stance to support allowing access for some pedal-assist e-bikes (those that top out at 20 mph) on some trails. With every major manufacturer making e-mountain bikes, more access is likely only a matter of time. “In a few years, people will realize that electric mountain bikes have no more trail impact than a regular mountain bike,” Benjamin says.
I really wanted to love this bike, I've only had it a few days, and it's probably too soon for a review, but I can see some issues with the bike. I'll start with the good, it was here 2 days after I ordered it which was amazingly fast shipping, the bike was easy to assemble, very sturdy and high quality looking and feeling, and even came with a nice tool set for assembly and a bell and water bottle, pretty good saddle, and I was very happy with the price, if it performs as I hope it will. Now the bad, as soon as I get a quarter mile from the house my battery indicator light goes from green to yellow, that is way too soon for the battery on a bike with this alleged range to be at "half life?". I have read in other reviews many have the same issue and say that it is just "inaccurate " and to "not pay attention to that" but it is disconcerting to me. Also the bike does not have the power I was expecting, it is truly a "peddle assist" bike, and not a throttler, the bike basically wants you to peddle and works best as you peddle, in fact the motor actually cuts on and off based on you peddling, in addition to cutting on with throttle, don't get me wrong it will power through on throttle alone on a flat surface pretty well, but if you expect not to do much peddling at all, this is not the bike for you. The fit of the bike isn't great for me, I am 6'2 and the fit for me is a bit awkward, ie: the bike is a bit small for me, anyone my height or taller may want to look at other options, and I can't raise the handle bars at all I don't think, although I believe you can change the angle of them. I've only taken it for 3 short rides as of yet and I was reasonably satisfied with the bikes response and power for my needs on these short trips, but I will have to take a few longer rides before I can give a more complete opinion. The bike is an eye catcher and I see people staring at it everywhere which is cool, I will update as long as I continue to own the bike, but I'm still a bit on the fence about it.
For Canyon’s first e-mtb the Spectal:ON 8.0 hasn’t simply hit the trail running, it’s power up it in Boost mode. The geometry, sizing and handling are all on point, and details like the adjustable geometry, odd wheel sizes, tyre specific rim widths and short cranks make Canyon a market leader rather than a brand that’s simply playing catch up. With a Fox 36 Fit4 fork the Spectral:ON 8.0 would probably have won the test, the more basic Grip damper never having the measure of Canyon’s superb rear suspension.
Mountain bikers and their associations (which I used to be a proud member of), should reconsider their anti-eMTB stance, realize there is a need and demand for Type 1 eMTBs, and focus their efforts on keeping trails open for all mountain bikes. Mountain bikers deserve the right to ride more of our public trails than we are currently allowed. I won’t open a can of worms with my strong opinions on where I believe mountain bikes should be allowed, but suffice it to say that we don’t have near enough access as we should.
Mountain bikes have come a long way since the 80s. Rock Shox showed up and eventually everyone had a hardtail bike. Then came dual-suspension bikes for all sorts of riding styles. My choice was a cross-country bike so I could climb fast and descend fast without the need for big air. Brakes have gone from simple calipers, to grippy Shimano V-Brakes, to bomber hydraulic disk brakes. While all this was going on street-focused eBikes were evolving too. It should be no shock that the technologies would merge to create eMTBs. A lot of people who were part of the mountain biking revolution in the 80s are getting older and eBikes allow them to continue the sport they love later in life. Whether it’s riders dealing with health issues or injuries, or simply just getting older, the emergence of eMTBs makes total sense.
More powerful pedelecs which are not legally classed as bicycles are dubbed S-Pedelecs (short for Schnell-Pedelecs, i.e. Speedy-Pedelecs) in Germany. These have a motor more powerful than 250 watts and less limited, or unlimited, pedal-assist, i.e. the motor does not stop assisting the rider once 25 km/h has been reached. S-Pedelec class e-bikes are therefore usually classified as mopeds or motorcycles rather than as bicycles and therefore may (depending on the jurisdiction) need to be registered and insured, the rider may need some sort of driver's license (either car or motorcycle) and motorcycle helmets may have to be worn.[14] In the United States, many states have adopted S-Pedelecs into the Class 3 category. Class 3 ebikes are limited to <=750 watts of power and 28 mph.[15]
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