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The Brose motor puts out 250 watts nominally, and can peak up to a max of 460 watts. That’s around half what the 2016 Specialized Turbo S road bike we tested last year develops, but that bike’s much-larger motor sits in the rear hub, which would massively compromise performance on a full-suspension mountain bike like this one. Spend up to the Expert or S-Works spec Turbo Levo and you get a motor that can peak up to 530 watts. 
Direct-sales German brand Canyon’s entry into the e-MTB market came with a bang. The Spectral:ON is a stunning bike with a superb build kit, decent geometry and respectable weight (21.2KG listed weight). As with anything Canyon, it’s hard to find better value for money. The entry-level 6.0 is down there with the lowest-cost serious e-MTBs available, yet its build kit, including RockShox Yari fork, Schwalbe Magic Mary tyres and Shimano Deore XT derailleur, ensures the bike punches well above its price.
Over the course of our testing, our testers universally agreed that the HaiBike XDURO AllMtn 8.0 had the most responsive and robust motor. The system felt almost twitchy, raring to go with a torquey feel that started the moment you pushed on the pedals. It got up to speed quickly and felt like it had the fastest top speed of all the models we tested. The power output was smooth and consistent, and shifting between the system's 5 support settings went off without a hitch. Testers also loved that the power band extended for a moment after you stop pedaling, not quite as long as the Commencal, but enough to still be a benefit on the climbs. The Commencal has a similarly strong motor, but couldn't quite match the torquey feel of the HaiBike or the top speed, although it has an even longer push of the power band when the pedaling stops. Both the Trek and the Specialized motor systems felt slightly less powerful, still offering plenty of pedal-assist support mind you, but that also resulted in the most efficient motors and longer distance ranges than the models with more brute power. Note that our Turbo Levo showed up with a top speed limit of 16mph and not the 20mph. We were very disappointed with 16mph as a max speed. Luckily, we were able to get it adjusted back to 20 and were then quite happy. If you buy a Specialized, make sure it's set to 20mph.

The environmental effects involved in recharging the batteries can of course be reduced. The small size of the battery pack on an e-bike, relative to the larger pack used in an electric car, makes them very good candidates for charging via solar power or other renewable energy resources. Sanyo capitalized on this benefit when it set up "solar parking lots", in which e-bike riders can charge their vehicles while parked under photovoltaic panels.[66]
With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability.
In addition, Kalk weighs under 155 pounds — less than half of traditional motorbikes. Cake customized parts of the drivetrain and implemented an interior permanent magnet (IPM) motor. On a single charge, the bike travels up to 50 miles and as a bonus feature, maintenance is minimal due to the fact there are few moving parts thanks to its lack of a combustion engine.

As the CleanTechnica series has been showing, electric bikes are an increasingly big business, and becoming the dominant form of motorized two-wheel transportation globally. The innovation, design, and money is flowing to electric bicycles much more than motorcycles. This is part and parcel of our increasing urbanization and demographic shifts globally. Electric bikes just make sense. They shorten commutes, they flatten hills, they make groceries and children light, they are fun, and they are clean, silent, and convenient.
In our view, e-bikes are approaching a crossroads in concept and design. Heading off in one direction are longer travel, enduro-style e-bikes, which are largely designed for cruising up and then blasting back down. Plotting a slightly different course is the idea of a lightweight model that rides much more like a normal mountain bike, but requires more work from the rider. Of the two approaches, both have their benefits, but it’s the latter that gets us the most excited. Once the overall weight falls into the 16-17kg range (the lightest bikes are currently19-20kg) it’s going to be really hard to tell the difference between an e-bike and a regular trail bike on the descents and the flat, but you get the benefit of a gentle push up the climbs.
Forward-thinking parents are giving up thier SUVs and opting for electric cargo bikes for getting the family around. Cargo bikes are seeing a resurgence in popularity with the rise of electric conversion systems that convert these awesome people movers into family toting electric vehicles. One year ago the Wall Street Journal ran a full page article in their weekend edition entitled The New Station Wagon. Since then the trend for...

Mountain electric bikes can even be used for commuting to work or going to the grocery store.  When choosing a mountain eBike, make sure that you pick one that has at least 500 to 750 watts of power. Having a powerful motor to assist you on the trail will keep your legs from being sore at the end of the day. This will ensure that you get the most out of your bike and be able to drive across rocks and logs with ease. 


For over a century, BH has been synonymous with bikes, competitive cycling, and industry leading technology and engineering. Today, we offer high performance electric bikes and acoustic bikes for all cycling disciplines: eMTB, MTB, eUrban, eGravel, Gravel, eCross, and Cyclocross. Our technological innovations, like the ATOM X and XTEP electric mountain bikes, the new G7 Disk range and EVO Ultralight, or the Split Pivot system in the Lynx full suspension MTB, allow us to shape the future and deliver our riders the exclusive BH cycling experience. Our passion and commitment to bikes and to cyclists has made us an icon in the current world of cycling…as well as one of the most established, respected, and internationally successful brands around. See the BH electric mountain bikes...
This past July 1st we moved our location to Croydon, PA and doubled our space. Additionally we're looking to hire at least 2 additional employees! This is all to support our expanding conversion kit business and to support some new business we have planned starting in September (more to come on that soon). We would like to thank every single one of our customers, partners, associates and fans for your...
Many many thanks for your wonderful customer services, and a wonderful bike you had prepared for me.  Now, this bike becomes my physical therapy machine and a commuting transportation in the busy streets of San Francisco. Truly, the R15 upgrade is a very powerful e-bike.  I can practically say that this bike is a hybrid of motorcycle and bicycle.  The… Read more ““Just no comparison””

This isn't just the lightest mountain bike frame we've ever made, it's our lightest frame—period. The Men's Epic Hardtail was redesigned from the ground-up to give you an unparalleled performance advantage on the XC track. It flies up hills with ease, sends descents with confidence, and wastes nary a watt. Consider it a cross country revolution, and remember, this is going to be epic.
From the tropics to the polar caps, Stark Drive is designed to handle a broad range of temperature conditions with a ruggedized frame and high quality battery pack as well as all terrain tires (standard) or even our fat tire model. Take Stark Drive with you wherever you go. When Designing Stark Drive in Stockholm Sweden we were very conscious of the fact that weather effects battery life on your electric bike so we designed our electric bike with this in mind.
I used to mountain bike quite a lot. I was a fairly strong 17 stone (238lb) weightlifter and rode pretty fast but didn't go in for big air or jumps. Nevertheless I used to break bikes at a ridiculous rate. I broke the bottom bracket off a Marin titanium frame, I broke the bottom bracket off of a Roberts hand built mountain bike. I snapped 2 pairs of handlebars, broke cranks, pedals, chains, wheels, spokes and forks etc etc.
Come for the price, stay for the awesome. The August Live! LS is one of the lower-cost e-bikes you’ll find. What it lacks is gadgets it makes up for in flare and retains just what you need. You won't find a digital display or integrated lights, Instead you get trendy, chopper-style handlebars, a sweet paint job, and a 250 watt motor that is more than capable of tackling steep hills without a second thought. That said, this bike just begs to be ridden on casual cruises down the boardwalk or bike path.
Update: Well I've had an opportunity to take the bike on some longer trips now 10 miles back and forth a few times, and the bike performed well, so I am raising my rating to 4 stars. I got a larger seat and raised the angle of the handle bars and it is more comfortable to ride than it was, but still a bit awkward for someone of my size. I've been leaving the bike charging all the time I'm not using it and this seemed to make a big difference with the indicator light not coming on as soon, and the biggest difference is made by me riding the bike the way it was meant to be ridden, ie: pedaling, I was treating it more like a scooter and just staying on the throttle before, but if you use it as a peddle assist bike, the way it's meant to be ridden it performs quite well. The bike is not great going up hills and you still have to work but it does make hills a lot easier. It is also frustrating not having more gears, you basically just leave the bike in 6 gear all the time, and peddle when you can ie: when your slow enough you can peddle. I have no problem with the weight of the bike and it is solid and well built and it will work for my purposes, fortunately the town I live in is only about 5 miles end to end so I don't need the bike to be able to go super long distances, and fortunately I don't mind peddling some, so I don't mind the bike being a peddle assist bike and not a more scooter type. One other gripe I do have is the bike does not have the standard holes to mount a back rack to, one of the main reasons I got this bike was to carry groceries and stuff more easily, so I'm disappointed that it will be difficult for me to mount a rack to, but I'm sure a front basket would work. Anyway, 4 stars, I like it, the price is great, it's well constructed, you will have a hard time finding an electric bike of this quality at this price, but it is not without a little sacrifice.
As the CleanTechnica series has been showing, electric bikes are an increasingly big business, and becoming the dominant form of motorized two-wheel transportation globally. The innovation, design, and money is flowing to electric bicycles much more than motorcycles. This is part and parcel of our increasing urbanization and demographic shifts globally. Electric bikes just make sense. They shorten commutes, they flatten hills, they make groceries and children light, they are fun, and they are clean, silent, and convenient.
After 2 months of online research and talking to people that owned e-bikes I walked into the Glendale, Arizona Pedego store. I met the owners Sherry and Steve. They suggested I try the Ridge Rider as it might be a fit for me. I test rode it for about 45 minutes to an hour and was somewhat convinced this could be the bike for me. I went home and did more research on the Ridge Rider. After careful thought I decided to purchase one the next day. Since then Steve, the owner, has worked with me to personalize my bike so that it is as comfortable on the trails as it is on the road. I cannot say enough about the after sale experience I have received from Sherry and Steve. I would recommend them and their store to anyone interested in an e-bike.

E-Bikes are a new segment of cycling in Moab. Since an E-Bike is considered motorized by the local BLM and Forest Service, there are rules and laws on where you are allowed to ride. E-bikes are not allowed on most of the singletrack trails in and around the Moab area including the paved bike paths running along highway 191, the river road (HWY 128) and throughout the city of Moab.


Cargo bikes and city bikes are common in the e-bike space, but until recently we haven’t seen that many performance road bikes. The Giant Road E+1 is a pedal-assist performance road bike that’s made for more than just commuting; the powerful motor can rank you up to 28mph very quickly on the highest setting so you can rip the flats, join your local group ride, or blast through the mountains with far less effort than a traditional road bike. Don't expect it to feel like a 16lb race bike when you lean it into high-speed turns, but the endurance-oriented geometry allows for an aggressive position on the bike and keeps the it nimble and agile at high speed.
When looking for the perfect ebike, there are a lot of things to consider. There’s price, weight, capabilities, performance and something that’s hard to quantify: feel. That’s a combination of factors that is affected by the geometry of the bike, its materials, components and other nuances. I took a ride on the crowd-funded Carbo folding bike this week and I’m not sure I’ve ever felt as comfortable on a folding bike in the city as I did on this extremely light, yet powerful ebike.
In the 1890s, electric bicycles were documented within various U.S. patents. For example, on 31 December 1895, Ogden Bolton Jr. was granted U.S. Patent 552,271 for a battery-powered bicycle with "6-pole brush-and-commutator direct current (DC) hub motor mounted in the rear wheel". There were no gears and the motor could draw up to 100 amperes (A) from a 10-volt battery.[5]
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