The Benno e-Joy promises to be as fun to play with as it is to look at. Benno says it took inspiration from the timeless style of vintage Italian scooters and classic German cars. Add in the functionality of front and rear cargo racks and the 250w pedal-assist motor and you have a beautiful bike that's ready for anything. Cruise into town for groceries, wander comfortably along a gravel path on 2.35-inch balloon tires, or add the child seat attachment and take your kid along for the ride, and beach-goers will appreciate the surfboard rack. Whatever your cycling pleasure pursuit may be, the e-Joy can be your ticket to fun.
Hikers on Mt. Tam used to say we're crazy. Roadies called it a fad. Clunkers, tension discs— we left our eyes open, heads down, and kept designing. We kept evolving, and today, the Men's Turbo Levo FSR embodies a design unimaginable 40 years ago—a trail bike with pedal-assisted power on the climbs. A trail bike that gives you the power to ride more trails.
There are various kinds and classifications of electric bikes on the market, but the more common type is the Class 1, or pedal assist, bikes which have motor units that are activated by pedaling and are limited to lower speeds. In the US, Class 1 electric bikes, the type tested and reviewed here, are limited to a top speed of 20 mph and their motors are designed with a speed governor to regulate this. These types of e-bikes resemble modern mountain bikes, but they have significant battery packs and small motor units integrated onto and into the frame design. The e-MTB pedal-assist motor is typically built around the bottom bracket and provides varying levels of pedaling "support" directly into the drivetrain while the cranks are turning. Most drive unit systems offer several support settings that provide pedal assistance between 25% and 100% of the user's pedaling input.
What does this mean for anyone with Stark Drive that was backed with greater then a 250W motor? Quite simply, it means that as long as you have not modified Stark Drive in any way, and depending on your local countries regulations (if they differe with this EU Standard) you are now able to use your bike legally in your location no matter where you are in the EU.

The new Stumpjumper is the ultimate trail bike. Seriously, the damn thing rides like it’s on rails. It’s the most versatile trail bike we’ve ever made. And yeah, we’re stoked about that, but we’re even more excited about how well it’s tuned to you. We’ve said goodbye to proprietary bullshit, focused on your needs, and made, what we feel, is the new benchmark in trail bikes.
Over the course of our testing, our testers universally agreed that the HaiBike XDURO AllMtn 8.0 had the most responsive and robust motor. The system felt almost twitchy, raring to go with a torquey feel that started the moment you pushed on the pedals. It got up to speed quickly and felt like it had the fastest top speed of all the models we tested. The power output was smooth and consistent, and shifting between the system's 5 support settings went off without a hitch. Testers also loved that the power band extended for a moment after you stop pedaling, not quite as long as the Commencal, but enough to still be a benefit on the climbs. The Commencal has a similarly strong motor, but couldn't quite match the torquey feel of the HaiBike or the top speed, although it has an even longer push of the power band when the pedaling stops. Both the Trek and the Specialized motor systems felt slightly less powerful, still offering plenty of pedal-assist support mind you, but that also resulted in the most efficient motors and longer distance ranges than the models with more brute power. Note that our Turbo Levo showed up with a top speed limit of 16mph and not the 20mph. We were very disappointed with 16mph as a max speed. Luckily, we were able to get it adjusted back to 20 and were then quite happy. If you buy a Specialized, make sure it's set to 20mph.
This bike is named the GSD because with it you can Get Stuff Done. Twenty-inch wheels keep the center of gravity low so heavy payloads—it's rated up to 400lbs—are easy to balance and a short (for a cargo bike) 70-inch wheelbase, similar to a standard single bike, make the GSD easy to maneuver. Designed with the urban commuter in mind, the bike can easily break down to 60 percent of its original size to fit into the back of a car and the rear rack doubles as a stand that allows it to stand upright to minimize space inside tight apartments. Put two child seats on the back and take the family along, or drop the seat and let you kid take the bike out himself—anyone from 4'10" to 6'5" can ride this bike. Last but not least, the GSD gives you the option of adding a second battery to extend your range up to about 150 miles on a single charge.
For those looking for a fast, versatile, and highly capable full suspension ride should seriously consider taking the Powerfly 7 FS Plus for a spin. Reason being, not only does the ride host an integrated mountain-specific Bosch motor with a top speed of 20 mph, but a full RockShox suspension setup, mid-fat tires for enhanced stability, and high-end mountain bike components work to elevate your mountain biking experience for the better. From rough to nearly impenetrable terrain the Trek Powerfly could very well be the solution to your desired exploration.
Installing an electric bike kit is easy to do, can be done in just an hour or so and can last for many years if done right initially. Deciding on the right electric bike conversion kit, the one that suits your riding style and your bike best, is the most important decision you’ll make during this process. Good news... you’ve come to the right place!
Not the best bike but good for what it is. 250watt. not enough power even for small hills on its own and does not do 15/hr even on flat ground. battery looses power when cold but still works. Over all so far, dispite the above I give it 4 stars because it is what you would excpect in a cheap bike and it does work. There is no braket for the headlight tho so be warned you will have to improvise on that.
Dan has a lifetime of experience with bicycles and is a hands-on expert when it comes to converting bicycle to electric.  Dan is the person you will most likely converse with on Live Chat. He can assist with diagnosing any issues and he is more than happy to enlighten those who ask on almost any topic related to electric bikes. Dan has been riding electric bikes almost daily since 2008...
I'm looking to leverage the Cycle to Work Scheme and have been looking around for an e-bike to purchase. I used a lot of the information provided here and have come to the conclusion that the Kreiger from Woosh meets all my needs. 95% of the time the bike will be used to commute to and from work, the rest of the time I'll probably be rising it around the park with the kids. The thing I like about this bike is that it pretty much comes with everything (except the lock) that you'd need to get going. I guess, if I really wanted to, I could upgrade the Bafang motor on this to a BBS02 with a better battery.
Whether you need to fly uphill with ease, rip downhill terrain at speed, or your rides simply demand all of the above, we've designed and engineered every mountain bike in our line to be the best performing machines for the way that you ride. From ultra-lightweight XC hardtails to our World-Championship-proven FSR suspension designs found on our trail and downhill bikes, you'll find the ideal setup for your riding style.
What exactly is an electric bike? How can they be used for transportation and why do they make financial sense? These are some of the questions my site http://electricbikereview.com and this channel aim to help you answer. This particular video provides an overview of the Easy Motion Neo Jumper ebike and then follows me on an actual commute to work in Austin Texas.
Electric Bike Parts, what fits my older electric bike? What can I modify to fit my bike? A brief overview of what electric bike parts do, and how generic electric bike parts can be adapted to your bike. The Plugs, Wires & Connectors Hardly a day goes by without a call that goes about like this; "I have a (whatever) electric bike that I used to ride 6 years ago....

Another type of electric assist motor, often referred to as the mid-drive system, is increasing in popularity. With this system, the electric motor is not built into the wheel but is usually mounted near (often under) the bottom bracket shell. In more typical configurations, a cog or wheel on the motor drives a belt or chain that engages with a pulley or sprocket fixed to one of the arms of the bicycle's crankset. Thus the propulsion is provided at the pedals rather than at the wheel, being eventually applied to the wheel via the bicycle's standard drive train.
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