The seat is a long, tapering bench-style saddle common to this genre of e-bike. The design allows the same size frame to fit multiple sized riders. While it’s not quite the same as having a fully adjustable frame, e-bikes don’t require the same precision fitment due to their electric assist. When you’re using the bike like a motorcycle, you just kind of sit wherever is comfortable.
Generally speaking, e-bikes are bicycles with a battery-powered “assist” that comes via pedaling or, in some cases, a throttle. When you push the pedals on a pedal-assist e-bike, a small motor engages and gives you a boost, so you can zip up hills and cruise over tough terrain without gassing yourself. Called “pedalecs,” they feel just like conventional bikes—but better, says Ed Benjamin, senior managing director at the consulting firm eCycleElectric. “You control your speed with your feet, like with a regular bike,” he says. “You just feel really powerful and accelerate easily.”
Countless others have popped up since all over the world, proving that the design has been popular with consumers. However, most people don’t know where the craze started. In fact, it can all be traced back right here to Coast Cycle’s original Buzzraw, which actually started life as Coast Cycles’ Ruckus bike. The Singapore-based company quickly changed the name to Buzzraw, probably fearing Honda’s lawyers.

After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the US, there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you're pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28mph. Both of those are allowed in most states and cities without license. Class 2 have throttles that don't require you to pedal to get a boost. They're allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because we still love to pedal and the greater distances pedal assist bikes can cover).
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.
A stealthy, long travel, all-mountain electric bike with longer wheel base and adjustable seat stay hardware to optimize geometry for climbing and descending, proprietary "Active Braking Pivot" rear suspension reduces skipping, Knock Block headset and Hartzell Hug impact-absorbing downtube bumpers allow for straight downtube. Trek-invented Boost hub spacing improves spoke bracing angle and support for larger plus sized tires,…...

We’ve got to give you a Haibike downhill option considering their excellent history with downhill and enduro models. Downhill models are traditionally incredibly expensive, but the DwnHll 9.0 offers a slightly lower price point for a top mountain bike. The build is incredibly slack so you can rip downhill in ideal positioning. The PW-X motor makes climbing much more enjoyable as well.
First of all, you’ll get a RockShox Lyrik RC Boost solo fork with 150mm of travel. You don’t find this fork on many electric mountain bikes at this price point. The new Brose Drive S motor is also featured on this bike. This is great for e-MTBs because it has 5 nm more torque than last year’s Brose bikes. You’ll also get a top-of-the-line derailleur with a Shimano Deore XT 11-speed drivetrain.
For those who know the brand, Ducati makes lust-inspiring road motorcycles, covering the range from scramblers to naked bikes to sport bikes. They’ve topped podiums globally, appeared in too many movies to name, and in some cases have ended on display in art galleries. But like everyone in the motorcycle business, the company is challenged by global changes and is looking to capitalize on its valuable brand. Likely it was challenged to by its corporate overlords, as the Ducati company was acquired by Audi and hence VW in 2012.
REBEL electric bikes powered by the Yamaha central motor create Dynamic and Responsive Power. It also enables the use of a conventional groupset and offers no resistance in «no assistance» mode. The eMTB bikes range have an “External DT System” battery, located in the front triangle and integrated with the design of the frame. The relative position of the less lightweight parts of the system (motor and battery) enables a low center of gravity, guaranteeing a reactive and stable ebike. See the REBEL electric bike models...
Scott’s top-rung e-MTB is one of the best-looking e-bikes available. Not only that, it’s also kitted out with outstanding components, including Shimano Di2 electronic shifting and Scott’s proprietary TwinLoc remote suspension mode shifter (open/trail/lockout).  Shimano's Steps motor will get you reliably up to speed along the varied trails this bike is made for, while its powerful Zee brakes will slow you down again. Its quality can't be disputed. Other price points available.

For those who aren’t frequent riders, e-bikes open up a whole new world. While you may not be conditioned to ride 5-10 miles at a time, you can cover those distances easily with an electrical assist, which is a great way to build endurance and confidence. That same survey found that 94 percent of non-cyclists rode daily or weekly after getting an e-bike.


For over a century, BH has been synonymous with bikes, competitive cycling, and industry leading technology and engineering. Today, we offer high performance electric bikes and acoustic bikes for all cycling disciplines: eMTB, MTB, eUrban, eGravel, Gravel, eCross, and Cyclocross. Our technological innovations, like the ATOM X and XTEP electric mountain bikes, the new G7 Disk range and EVO Ultralight, or the Split Pivot system in the Lynx full suspension MTB, allow us to shape the future and deliver our riders the exclusive BH cycling experience. Our passion and commitment to bikes and to cyclists has made us an icon in the current world of cycling…as well as one of the most established, respected, and internationally successful brands around. See the BH electric mountain bikes...
Direct-to-consumer Italian brand Thok’s MIG bike has reviewers falling at its feet. Why? It simply offers a superb package – its geometry and construction are as on-the-ball as its choice of Shimano motor, battery placement – giving low centre of gravity – and quality build kit. At under £4k, the MIG is great value too (there is also a pricier MIG R, featuring upgraded components). Thok knows its stuff, which is hardly surprising when you look at its founder. Former champion downhill racer Stefano Migliorini understands what makes a good bike, and he personally leads the charge on bike development at Thok.

China has experienced an explosive growth of sales of non-assisted e-bikes including scooter type, with annual sales jumping from 56,000 units in 1998 to over 21 million in 2008,[72] and reaching an estimated fleet of 120 million e-bikes in early 2010.[2][73] This boom was triggered by Chinese local governments' efforts to restrict motorcycles in city centers to avoid traffic disruption and accidents. By late 2009 motorcycles are banned or restricted in over ninety major Chinese cities.[72] Users began replacing traditional bicycles and motorcycles and e-bike became an alternative to commuting by car.[2] Nevertheless, road safety concerns continue as around 2,500 e-bike related deaths were registered in 2007.[73] By late 2009 ten cities had also banned or imposed restrictions on e-bikes on the same grounds as motorcycles. Among these cities were Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Changsha, Foshan, Changzhou, and Dongguang.[72][73]
Both land management regulators and mountain bike trail access advocates have argued for bans of electric bicycles on outdoor trails that are accessible to mountain bikes, citing potential safety hazards as well as the potential for electric bikes to damage trails. A study conducted by the International Mountain Bicycling Association, however, found that the physical impacts of low-powered pedal-assist electric mountain bikes may be similar to traditional mountain bikes.[68]
Remember the freedom, fun, and sense of accomplishment that your first bike gave you? Well, these days, kids can share that excitement at even earlier age with our collection of kids' bikes and equipment. From toddler-friendly walk bikes to pint-sized helmets, we have everything you need to get your little ones away from the screen and out on their bikes.
By 1898 a rear-wheel drive electric bicycle, which used a driving belt along the outside edge of the wheel, was patented by Mathew J. Steffens. Also, the 1899 U.S. Patent 627,066 by John Schnepf depicted a rear-wheel friction “roller-wheel” style drive electric bicycle.[7] Schnepf's invention was later re-examined and expanded in 1969 by G.A. Wood Jr. with his U.S. Patent 3,431,994. Wood’s device used 4 fractional horsepower motors; connected through a series of gears.[8]
×