However, if your friends are riding a bigger single battery pack, you’ll have to either choose to cut the ride short or conserve battery life while they run in turbo. If your local rides are short, fast blasts but you want to benefit from the ability to take on longer tours, the Sam2 could be for you. We love the Pro version, but it’s also available at a range of price points.
Many years of experience have clearly shown that it isn’t possible to make a universal and realistic estimate of an ebike’s range. The range of an eMTB depends on countless factors such as the support level, terrain, rider weight, environmental conditions, and cadence. Those who demand a lot of power from the motor consume a lot of electricity. If you want to travel far, you’ll have to save battery power. Read more about this topic in our article The truth about lab tests.

Descents on such a heavy bike are less fun. Getting the rear wheel off the ground on short notice, or whipping it around turns is very hard. I like to use my rear tire and brakes to steer—locking the brakes in tight corners at speed, then letting off and pedaling out. On very loose and exposed trails, using that approach on the Turbo Levo doesn't work, once the rear starts to loose traction, it’s just all over. Perhaps this could be combated with lower rear tire pressures; we were running 20 PSI. 

It means you can fit much more riding into one session. Or if you want to cover more distance (as often the best riding spots are quite far apart here in the UK) e mountain bikes are perfect for the job. All the usual MTB configurations are available – everything from wheel size to forks and more, and there’s the choice of hardtail or full suspension electric mountain bike too.


Just take a look at the Kenevo and you know it wants to go fast. Downhill. And probably destroy every turn it sees. The tank-like aesthetic and aggressive geometry does indeed allude to the bikes intended purpose. If downhills are your thing, the burly Kenevo is your friend: it’ll get you to the top with ease but, once the seat drops, you won’t be able to stop it. There’s not a lot more to be said about it – the best in its class…


Prodeco V5 Phantom X Lite 9 Speed Folding Electric Bicycle is a lightweight and well-balanced bike that is suitable for all adventurers, campers, and sports enthusiasts. It gives an outstanding and smooth performance with a 300-watt motor. It is an eye-catching bike that looks fabulous in black color. Plus, you can carry it with you by simply folding it.
Engineered to climb swiftly and efficiently, the Trailfox AMP Two is ready to take you where no ordinary mountain bike has taken you before. It’s all thanks to the likes of a Shimano E8000 drive unit, 650b+ wheels and tires for incredible traction, a Twin Hollow-core Tube Design, E-Specific Suspension Linkage for precise handling, and an E-Specific Advanced Pilot System offering an active yet efficient suspension system for the taking. Best of all, this is only the beginning of what the Trailfox has to offer.
Direct-to-consumer Italian brand Thok’s MIG bike has reviewers falling at its feet. Why? It simply offers a superb package – its geometry and construction are as on-the-ball as its choice of Shimano motor, battery placement – giving low centre of gravity – and quality build kit. At under £4k, the MIG is great value too (there is also a pricier MIG R, featuring upgraded components). Thok knows its stuff, which is hardly surprising when you look at its founder. Former champion downhill racer Stefano Migliorini understands what makes a good bike, and he personally leads the charge on bike development at Thok.
This is a question the designers and engineers of the FOCUS and BULLS bikes of this group test asked themselves. Instead of speccing them with the standard 500 Wh batteries, both have developed a sophisticated alternative. The idea: instead of riding around with unnecessarily large batteries and unnecessary weight on short tours, they integrated a smaller 375 Wh or 378 Wh battery into the bike. If you don’t have enough power for long loops, you can double the range of both bikes with an additional battery for up to a full 750 Wh. While the second battery is mounted in the front triangle of the FOCUS, it disappears sideways in the downtube of the BULLS. In practice, you’ll need the second battery relatively often with both bikes, and in either case, you should consider the additional € 499 investment in a second battery pack when you buy the bike.
On a trip to Palo Alto last year, we had the chance to ride Specialized’s pedal-assisted Turbo Vado and the model is still our favorite ebike on the market. Utilizing a 350-watt motor and 604-watt-hour lithium-ion battery, the Turbo Vado is capable of traveling a whopping 80 miles on a single charge, which should be more than enough for any daily commute with plenty of miles left over.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque and others are quieter. But generally all four make good options. Look for motor output (in watts) which will give you an idea of total power. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a better figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a truer reflection of power.

A low-mounted motor keeps the centre of gravity low and the entire system compact, while allowing for ultra-short chainstays and a bottom bracket that is integral to the frame. We use a high efficiency, three-phase brushless motor to provide class-leading torque and ultra quiet operation. To get instant power response on trail, we put the torque sensor between the chainring and the drive gear, and our 48v battery voltage allows for super fast charging.
Sleek, powerful, and modern. If those characteristics strike a chord for you then the Bulls E-Core bike could be the pick of the litter so to speak. Each handsome yet power-infused ride is assisted by Shimano’s new 250W E-8000 eMTB motor alongside a 375Wh power pack. Thanks to this power plant, this sweet ride boasts enough juice and torque to conquer and climb even the toughest of trails. Additional features include a 180mm front RockShox Lyrik, a rear Fox Float X2 Air suspension to smooth out that descent, Di2 XT electronic shifting, and 203mm Shimano XT hydraulic disc brakes.
Works well with most Pedego models. Single bike max weight: 60 pounds. Total max weight: 120 pounds. Secure bikes quickly without frame contact with the frame-free ratcheting arm Eliminate bike interference by adjusting side to side to create generous spacing between bike mounts Ideal for carbon frames, mountain, downhill, and fat bikes as it fits […]
Electric Bike Parts, what fits my older electric bike? What can I modify to fit my bike? A brief overview of what electric bike parts do, and how generic electric bike parts can be adapted to your bike. The Plugs, Wires & Connectors Hardly a day goes by without a call that goes about like this; "I have a (whatever) electric bike that I used to ride 6 years ago....

25 Mile 36V 250W Swytch eBike kit - for standard front forks (100mm). Instantly turn your regular bicycle into a state-of-the-art eBike with the Swytch conversion kit. Simply replace your regular front wheel with our compact and lightweight 1.5kg hub motor wheel. The handlebar-mounted power pack weighs just 2.5kg and can be attached instantly providing power assistance up to top speeds of 15mph (EU) or 20mph (USA). Also includes easy-fit pedal and brake sensors - simply start pedalling to receive motor assistance, and pull your brakes to for instant motor cut-off. Battery includes a UK/USA/EU charger depending on your region.
E-bike usage worldwide has experienced rapid growth since 1998. In 2016 there were 210 million electric bikes worldwide used daily.[33] It is estimated that there were roughly 120 million e-bikes in China in early 2010, and sales are expanding rapidly in India, the United States of America, Germany, the Netherlands,[2] and Switzerland.[34] A total of 700,000 e-bikes were sold in Europe in 2010, up from 200,000 in 2007 and 500,000 units in 2009.[35]
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