More powerful pedelecs which are not legally classed as bicycles are dubbed S-Pedelecs (short for Schnell-Pedelecs, i.e. Speedy-Pedelecs) in Germany. These have a motor more powerful than 250 watts and less limited, or unlimited, pedal-assist, i.e. the motor does not stop assisting the rider once 25 km/h has been reached. S-Pedelec class e-bikes are therefore usually classified as mopeds or motorcycles rather than as bicycles and therefore may (depending on the jurisdiction) need to be registered and insured, the rider may need some sort of driver's license (either car or motorcycle) and motorcycle helmets may have to be worn.[14] In the United States, many states have adopted S-Pedelecs into the Class 3 category. Class 3 ebikes are limited to <=750 watts of power and 28 mph.[15]
For over a century, BH has been synonymous with bikes, competitive cycling, and industry leading technology and engineering. Today, we offer high performance electric bikes and acoustic bikes for all cycling disciplines: eMTB, MTB, eUrban, eGravel, Gravel, eCross, and Cyclocross. Our technological innovations, like the ATOM X and XTEP electric mountain bikes, the new G7 Disk range and EVO Ultralight, or the Split Pivot system in the Lynx full suspension MTB, allow us to shape the future and deliver our riders the exclusive BH cycling experience. Our passion and commitment to bikes and to cyclists has made us an icon in the current world of cycling…as well as one of the most established, respected, and internationally successful brands around. See the BH electric mountain bikes...
The first thing many cyclists do when checking out a new bike is give it a lift to gauge the weight. You’re in for a little scale shock if you try that with an e-bike. The battery, motor, extra components, and reinforced frame make e-bikes inherently heavier than standard bikes—to the tune of about 20 pounds. Modern geometry and engineering help them handle well despite their weight, and obviously the motor-assist makes the extra pounds disappear when you start to pedal. But you’ll need more muscle to get them on your car rack or up and down stairs.

Pedelecs are much like conventional bicycles in use and function — the electric motor only provides assistance, for example, when the rider is climbing or struggling against a headwind. Pedelecs are therefore especially useful for people in hilly areas where riding a bike would prove too strenuous for many to consider taking up cycling as a daily means of transport. They are also useful for riders who more generally need some assistance, e.g. for people with heart, leg muscle or knee joint issues.


Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.

Motor: We have a blog post showing some motor differences: https://www.ebikekit.com/blogs/news/its-whats-inside-your-motor-that-counts Cabling is probably the #1 issue when something goes wrong. Good connectors, good cables, and good assembly (bike shop!) are crucial Strain reliefs on all cable joints! Where you have a junction box or a connector, the stress is concentrated over a small area near this stiff spot on the cable. This can cause small breaks on the internal...
Controllers for brushed motors: Brushed motors are also used in e-bikes but are becoming less common due to their intrinsic lower efficiency. Controllers for brushed motors however are much simpler and cheaper due to the fact they don't require hall sensor feedback and are typically designed to be open-loop controllers. Some controllers can handle multiple voltages.
Many years of experience have clearly shown that it isn’t possible to make a universal and realistic estimate of an ebike’s range. The range of an eMTB depends on countless factors such as the support level, terrain, rider weight, environmental conditions, and cadence. Those who demand a lot of power from the motor consume a lot of electricity. If you want to travel far, you’ll have to save battery power. Read more about this topic in our article The truth about lab tests.
While the first functional battery was developed in the year 1800 by Italian physicist Alessandro Volta, a practical battery would not be seen for several decades yet. By the end of the 19th century, practical and portable batteries were more widely available, this finally freeing the electric motor to be used in a wide new array of applications. It might come as a surprise, but the electric motor, battery, and a bicycle were first paired as far back as the 1890s. It would be approximately 100 years later that electric bicycle development finally entered the mainstream, but the technology and concept behind the electric bike were all in place generations ago.

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In Stock & Free Shipping Now! INDUSTRY ALUMINUM ALLOY FRAME: This e-bike adopts ultra-lightweight yet strong aluminum. Anti-rust and anti-exposure painting material LARGE-CAPACITY LITHIUM BATTERY: The 36V/8AH li battery of the folding bike supports 25km/15.5 mile (E-Bike Mode) to 50km/31 mile (Assisted Mode) ridding. It equipped with smart lithium battery charger has fast charging (4-6 hrs.) ULTRA STRONG WHEELS: 26-inch magnesium alloy integrated wheels with anti-slip resistant thick tire-- Suit for rainy or snowy mountain way and roadway. The bike is foldable. It will save much space for your daily use BRAKE & MOTOR SYSTEM: This electric bike has mechanical...

In a parallel hybrid motorized bicycle, such as the aforementioned 1897 invention by Hosea W. Libbey, human and motor inputs are mechanically coupled either in the bottom bracket, the rear wheel, or the front wheel, whereas in a (mechanical) series hybrid cycle, the human and motor inputs are coupled through differential gearing. In an (electronic) series hybrid cycle, human power is converted into electricity and is fed directly into the motor and mostly additional electricity is supplied from a battery.
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