Two bikes clearly set themselves apart from the rest of the test field: the brand-new BULLS E-CORE EVO EN Di2 and the Specialized Turbo Levo S-Works Carbon. Both brands are huge players with great innovative power, and you can tell this from their bikes. The BULLS impressed with its cleverly thought-out modular battery concept, top-end, well-considered spec, and very balanced handling. “Climb aboard and feel at home” is its tagline. Thanks to the 180 mm of travel, the bike offers plenty of reserves for those larger hits, yet still feels agile and playful. With this brilliant combination, the € 6,499 BULLS secures itself the desired Best Value tip!
“I’d like a Bosch bike!” This is what bicycle dealers hear several times a day from new customers – and it’s the biggest mistake you can make when buying an ebike. Sure, the motor is important. However, you don’t buy a car just because of its engine. If you want to be happy with your eMTB in the long term, you have to consider a bike as an overall concept. This group test will help you to find out which bike is best for which type of rider, terrain, and riding style. The motors of the big names in the industry all work extremely well, but differ in their purpose and functionality.
Aluminium alloy frames and downtube mounted batteries with integrated motors provide a budget friendly introduction to these motor-assisted bikes, allowing riders who would struggle to keep up to enjoy the stamina of the pros. For those hard hitters, fully integrated battery and motors combine with lightweight alloy and carbon frames to deliver a ride that’ll take on the most demanding trails.
There's no room for failure in DH. That's why our Demo 8 downhill mountain bikes get right down to business. They're designed to be the fastest bikes on the track, and with a World Cup overall, it's safe to say that we did it right. You'll find 200mm of our FSR suspension, aggressive S3 DH race geometry, asymmetrical frames, and 650b wheels. It's a machine primed to give you maximum control over the gnarliest terrain that the mountain can muster.
While the first functional battery was developed in the year 1800 by Italian physicist Alessandro Volta, a practical battery would not be seen for several decades yet. By the end of the 19th century, practical and portable batteries were more widely available, this finally freeing the electric motor to be used in a wide new array of applications. It might come as a surprise, but the electric motor, battery, and a bicycle were first paired as far back as the 1890s. It would be approximately 100 years later that electric bicycle development finally entered the mainstream, but the technology and concept behind the electric bike were all in place generations ago.
When riding a normal bike through creek crossings, and rock gardens, I typically stop pedaling often to avoid pedal strikes, and to maneuver the bike. This approach is not compatible with the Turbo Levo’s weight. On it, continual pedaling was necessary, but the big tires and well-damped suspension enabled me to roll over obstacles I’d typically try to avoid, with the motor helping me power over them smoothly. To make this constant pedaling possible without pedal strikes, the bottom bracket is moved higher and Specialized has spec’d 170mm cranks that are a tad shorter than normal. 

There’s no getting around it: E-bikes give you yet another device to charge. Right now, you can expect your battery to last anywhere from 35-100 miles before it needs a recharge. Where you fall in that range depends on the size of the battery and how much power the motor draws. Obviously, if you buzz around on “turbo” all day, you’ll run out of juice faster than if you run on lower, more economical settings. But we also expect batteries to improve in the future.

On the AM 4 you get 150mm of travel via a Fox Factory 36 Float fork, 11-speeds from a Shimano Deore XT drivetrain, and Magura MT-Trail hydraulic disc brakes. They also don’t gip you on the dropper with a wonderful, wonderful KS Lev. In terms of geometry, the build is pretty dope. It’s a nice slack feel, so you can do some solid downhills. A DT Swiss wheelset along with Magic Mary tires give you a lightweight and smooth ride.
When you are one of the top car manufacturers in the world witnessing an ever-changing landscape of reluctant buyers, what should you do? Ideally, you take scope of what works and phase out what doesn’t. GM’s bold Bolt plan was to offer the electric vehicle (EV) as a personal means of transportation and a shared mobility platform through its Maven program. We haven’t heard much from that initiative and it seems GM is ready to get in bed with the top two ride-hailing companies, Uber and Lyft. Is GM a bit lost in its strategy? Or is it figuring out what works and sharpening its vision?
The seat is a long, tapering bench-style saddle common to this genre of e-bike. The design allows the same size frame to fit multiple sized riders. While it’s not quite the same as having a fully adjustable frame, e-bikes don’t require the same precision fitment due to their electric assist. When you’re using the bike like a motorcycle, you just kind of sit wherever is comfortable.
X-Treme Scooters Folding Electric Mountain E-Bike offers a comfortable ride with front and rear suspension. It is an ideal bike for the college students, campers, and anyone who wants a portable and lightweight mode of transportation. This E-bike works on a motor of 300 watts. The best thing about this bike is it allows you to fold it after reaching the destination. It gives you a speed of about 20 mph with a 7-speed Shimano tourney gears. You can adjust the seat according to your ease.
I took my new Pedego Ridge Rider for my first ride today – a 25 mile single track trail. I have been riding all my life and knee pain ended my daily club rides one year after retiring. My Ridge Rider makes me feel like a Titan! I have a mountain bike that was more expensive than the Ridge Rider and I must say that the Ridge Rider rivals or exceeds the quality and ride “feel” on my non-electric mountain bike (which I can no longer ride due to the extreme pain it creates on my knee). The Ridge Rider provided 100% joy and 0% pain. What can be better! The Ridge Rider is a no compromise bike with great running gear and amazing battery life. I rode 13 miles on assist level 3 and about 12 miles on assist level 4 and made it home with 15% battery life even though the temperature was about 43 degrees F. This is the best purchase I have ever made. I second all the other reviews. This is a fabulous bike supported by a fabulous manufacturer. I can’t give enough praise to Fitness Central in Schnecksville, PA. The owner and staff gave me better advice and attention than I could have hoped for. Thanks to one and all!
The first regularly produced device resembling the modern bicycle was unveiled in 1818. It was called the Dandy Horse. The two-wheeled ride-on Dandy Horse was the brainchild of German inventor Baron Karl Drais, and it featured a handle bar, a padded seat, and two inline wheels of nearly equal size. What it did not feature were pedals; this was a "running machine," thus its name in German, Laufmachine. The Dandy Horse saw only a flicker of popularity, and was largely an historical footnote within a handful of years, though its design is nearly mimicked in the child's balance bike of today.
Could Extend Battery Life; Monitor Battery Status. Powerful and HIGH SPEED Motor: 48V 500W high-speed brushless rear hub gear motor. It's faster and easier than a normal bike. Vtuvia has a professional electric bicycle experts and artistic designer team to develop electric mountain bike, electric city bike, fat Tyre electric bicycle and E bike conversion kit.
This past July 1st we moved our location to Croydon, PA and doubled our space. Additionally we're looking to hire at least 2 additional employees! This is all to support our expanding conversion kit business and to support some new business we have planned starting in September (more to come on that soon). We would like to thank every single one of our customers, partners, associates and fans for your...
Mountain bikes have come a long way since the 80s. Rock Shox showed up and eventually everyone had a hardtail bike. Then came dual-suspension bikes for all sorts of riding styles. My choice was a cross-country bike so I could climb fast and descend fast without the need for big air. Brakes have gone from simple calipers, to grippy Shimano V-Brakes, to bomber hydraulic disk brakes. While all this was going on street-focused eBikes were evolving too. It should be no shock that the technologies would merge to create eMTBs. A lot of people who were part of the mountain biking revolution in the 80s are getting older and eBikes allow them to continue the sport they love later in life. Whether it’s riders dealing with health issues or injuries, or simply just getting older, the emergence of eMTBs makes total sense.
Enjoy the thrill of the ride without the struggle. Although it looks just like a normal mountain bike, as soon as you pedal you will feel the difference. The Gtech Mountain eBilke has an easy to read LCD display, to tell you exactly how much charge you’ve got remaining. Ride for up to 30 miles on a single charge. For adventurous riders tackling more challenging conditions, the range may be reduced to 10 miles per charge**.
If exploration is the new black, then the Ariel is a bike dressed for adventure. Versatile and reliable, hit the road with purpose as you chase down your fitness goals, then satisfy your inner explorer as you veer onto the dirt with confidence. Its Women’s Custom tuned suspension and Multi-Circuit Damping fork turn rough to smooth, while giving you more control as you explore your world on two wheels.

On the AM 4 you get 150mm of travel via a Fox Factory 36 Float fork, 11-speeds from a Shimano Deore XT drivetrain, and Magura MT-Trail hydraulic disc brakes. They also don’t gip you on the dropper with a wonderful, wonderful KS Lev. In terms of geometry, the build is pretty dope. It’s a nice slack feel, so you can do some solid downhills. A DT Swiss wheelset along with Magic Mary tires give you a lightweight and smooth ride.
Name a type of riding, and there’s an e-bike for that. If you have zero interest in an electric road bike, you may find yourself head over heels for a high-capacity e-cargo bike that can haul 400 pounds of stuff while still cruising at a cool 15 mph. E-bikes are available in fat, cargo, commuter, recreational, hardtail, full-suspension mountain, and even performance road bike styles. For proof, here are a dozen e-bikes we love for every type of cyclist.
As electric bike options continue to expand, more brands are integrating the battery more seamlessly. That makes them look sleeker (and more like a real bike). Batteries are expensive, so make sure there's a good way lock the battery to your bike if you'll be keeping it outside. Overall weight is important. Some battery and motors can add 15 pounds or more to the bike. With assist, you won't feel that much when you're riding, but you will if you have to carry your bike up stairs or lift it onto a bike rack.
Generally speaking, e-bikes are bicycles with a battery-powered “assist” that comes via pedaling or, in some cases, a throttle. When you push the pedals on a pedal-assist e-bike, a small motor engages and gives you a boost, so you can zip up hills and cruise over tough terrain without gassing yourself. Called “pedalecs,” they feel just like conventional bikes—but better, says Ed Benjamin, senior managing director at the consulting firm eCycleElectric. “You control your speed with your feet, like with a regular bike,” he says. “You just feel really powerful and accelerate easily.”
There’s no getting around it: E-bikes give you yet another device to charge. Right now, you can expect your battery to last anywhere from 35-100 miles before it needs a recharge. Where you fall in that range depends on the size of the battery and how much power the motor draws. Obviously, if you buzz around on “turbo” all day, you’ll run out of juice faster than if you run on lower, more economical settings. But we also expect batteries to improve in the future.
Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides.
You should be extra aware about your local regulations as in many countries an L1e-A certified bike needs to be registered and insured (be sure to consult your local laws and rules) and with registration comes the security that the bike can be tracked if it is stolen or misplaced. This approval that we have received is European Union wide and even those countries that are not part of the EU but rather EEA do adopt similar regulations in order to keep the market common but you will need to consult with your authorities. We will detail more about the registration process in an upcoming blog post but if you have any questions you can email us and we will respond in kind.
Depending on local laws, many e-bikes (e.g., pedelecs) are legally classified as bicycles rather than mopeds or motorcycles. This exempts them from the more stringent laws regarding the certification and operation of more powerful two-wheelers which are often classed as electric motorcycles. E-bikes can also be defined separately and treated under distinct Electric bicycle laws.
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