Nicolas Zart Nicolas was born and raised around classic cars of the 1920s, but it wasn't until he drove an AC Propulsion eBox and a Tesla Roadster that the light went on. Eager to spread the news of that full torque, he was invited to write for various CleanTech outlets in 2007. Since then, his passion led to cover renewable energy, test drives, podcasts, shoot pictures, and film for various international outlets both in print and online. Nicolas offers an in-depth look at the e-mobility world through interviews and the many contacts he has forged in those industries. He particularly enjoys communicating about the new e-mobility technology and what it means to us as a society. Today he focuses most of his writing effort on CleanTechnica, a global online outlet that covers the world of electric vehicles and renewable energy. His favorite tagline is: "There are more solutions than obstacles."
A couple of days ago I went out with my 16yo son on our regular bikes. I soon realized that I can, at 52, no longer keep up with him and pushed myself way beyond what I should have. When we got home I seriously thought I was going to have a heart attack and had to lie down. I was very upset as it dawned on me that as my son got faster and faster I would get slower and slower and that meant I would hold him back on our rides. I decided to investigate and went online to see what was available to help me. I had never heard of Pedego but on a search a Pedego store came up that was a few miles from my home in Fort Worth, TX. I called and spoke to owner Vicky. I asked what time the store stayed open till and she said 5pm. I said j worked until 5pm and she immediately volunteered to stay open later for me to go down to the store. I arrived at 5.30pm and by 5.45pm after a test ride I had purchased my brand new Ridge Rider!! WOW! What a spectacular machine! I drove home perhaps a tad faster than I should have and my son and I went out for a ride. We did the same ride from a couple of days earlier and although I broke a sweat I got back home and felt great! Thanks to the amazing torque of the APS and buttery smooth gear changes I managed all the hills and slopes with ease and saved the flats for actual pedaling under my own steam. Thanks Pedego, you might just have saved my life!!

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The electric bike revolution has officially crossed into the arena of off-road motorbikes. For those who prefer riding in nature, Cake introduced a product which not only respects the environment but other riders, as well. Cake’s Kalk is a silent off-road motorbike that releases no emissions into the atmosphere. Additionally, its electric motor means no gear changing or clutching — a silent motorbike that won’t detract from the experience of others. Perhaps the best part is Cake avoided any sacrifice in performance. The Kalk reaches speeds of fifty miles per hour and features three distinct driving modes: Discover, Explore, and Excite.

We’ve got to give you a Haibike downhill option considering their excellent history with downhill and enduro models. Downhill models are traditionally incredibly expensive, but the DwnHll 9.0 offers a slightly lower price point for a top mountain bike. The build is incredibly slack so you can rip downhill in ideal positioning. The PW-X motor makes climbing much more enjoyable as well.

This bike is named the GSD because with it you can Get Stuff Done. Twenty-inch wheels keep the center of gravity low so heavy payloads—it's rated up to 400lbs—are easy to balance and a short (for a cargo bike) 70-inch wheelbase, similar to a standard single bike, make the GSD easy to maneuver. Designed with the urban commuter in mind, the bike can easily break down to 60 percent of its original size to fit into the back of a car and the rear rack doubles as a stand that allows it to stand upright to minimize space inside tight apartments. Put two child seats on the back and take the family along, or drop the seat and let you kid take the bike out himself—anyone from 4'10" to 6'5" can ride this bike. Last but not least, the GSD gives you the option of adding a second battery to extend your range up to about 150 miles on a single charge.
Alec wants your wheels to be strong and true when they leave our doors, and a well-built wheel will stay that way for years.  Alec would rather be outdoors, but he comes in to E-BikeKit each day to make sure that you’ve got what you need to make your own outdoor adventures happen. A day when Alec can keep you rolling down the road and enjoying your bike is a...
I have cerebral palsy and have used a powerchair since I was three.... About a year and a half ago I applied for a grant from the Challenged Athlete Foundation for a handcycle. While I was waiting for letters to go out I worked out at the gym. I was talking to my trainer about handcycles. I explained that because all of the weight was behind the drive wheel in...
When did mountain biking get so uptight? As we see it, fun is a right, and no matter where or when you're riding, it should always be at the heart of each pedal stroke. So whether you're on singletrack, sand, or snow, the Fatboy will deliver a good time. It has tire clearance for up to five inches, a lightweight M4 aluminum frame, snappy handling, and rack mounts that make it adventure-ready, the question is, 'what's taken you so long?'
Torque sensors and power controls were developed in the late 1990s. For example, Takada Yutky of Japan filed a patent in 1997 for such a device. In 1992 Vector Services Limited offered and sold an e-bike dubbed Zike.[9] The bicycle included NiCd batteries that were built into a frame member and included an 850 g permanent-magnet motor. Despite the Zike, in 1992 hardly any commercial e-bikes were available.
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