With an electric mountain bike (or e-MTB) that gives you assistance up to 25kph, it’s possible to pack twice as much riding into the same amount of time. Those five great trails that you normally ride after work can now be ridden twice. That boring singletrack climb on your lunchtime loop suddenly becomes the highlight of your day. With the extra push from the motor it’s easy to double the distance covered, or do the same ride in half the time.
Because the power is applied through the chain and sprocket, power is typically limited to around 250–500 watts to protect against fast wear on the drivetrain. An electric mid-drive combined with an internal gear hub at the back hub may require care due to the lack of a clutch mechanism to soften the shock to the gears at the moment of re-engagement. A continuously variable transmission or a fully automatic internal gear hub may reduce the shocks due to the viscosity of oils used for liquid coupling instead of the mechanical couplings of the conventional internal gear hubs.

Ethics aside, that’s not to say we don’t at least admire where the technology has taken us thus far – and where it appears to be heading- thanks to some of the best electric mountain bikes on the market today. Some, naturally, are more rugged and built to withstand greater beatings than others. While some feature a price tag similar to that of a new Harley-Davidson. Whatever the case, if the disposable income is there, as well as the integrity not to abuse the power these electric machines offer, then they’re certainly yours for the taking. Just have a look at our eight favorite picks below and see for yourself.


Most consumers want an e-bike that will accommodate its motor without being too cumbersome and will remain stable in spite of its electronic components. Some consumers want only the most basic of e-bike features, including lights, a cargo rack/basket, and a water bottle holder. Others are focused more heavily on safety features, such as brake type. And still others are concerned with convenience and portability.
Mountain electric bikes can even be used for commuting to work or going to the grocery store.  When choosing a mountain eBike, make sure that you pick one that has at least 500 to 750 watts of power. Having a powerful motor to assist you on the trail will keep your legs from being sore at the end of the day. This will ensure that you get the most out of your bike and be able to drive across rocks and logs with ease. 
This past July 1st we moved our location to Croydon, PA and doubled our space. Additionally we're looking to hire at least 2 additional employees! This is all to support our expanding conversion kit business and to support some new business we have planned starting in September (more to come on that soon). We would like to thank every single one of our customers, partners, associates and fans for your...

Installing an electric bike kit is easy to do, can be done in just an hour or so and can last for many years if done right initially. Deciding on the right electric bike conversion kit, the one that suits your riding style and your bike best, is the most important decision you’ll make during this process. Good news... you’ve come to the right place!


Remember when riding bikes was all about having fun? So do we. After all, we're big kids at heart over here, so creating the ultimate kids' mountain bike felt more like a labor of love than a job. For the all-new Riprock, we strove to create the bike that any of us would have drooled over as a little one. And with ultra-wide tires, supple suspension, a durable frame, comfortable, confident geometry, and strong, reliable disc brakes, we'd say that the Riprock is approved for fun anywhere that it goes.


Stop and go with care. Because you’re heavier and faster, it will take longer to slow down and stop. Squeeze your brakes well ahead of intersections. Remember that the bike will accelerate faster than normal, so don’t start pulling out into traffic until it’s fully clear. Also, because the bike has some heft, you may feel wobbly the first few times you get going or slow to a stop. Practice mounting, dismounting, and stopping in safe places before hitting heavily trafficked roads.
China has experienced an explosive growth of sales of non-assisted e-bikes including scooter type, with annual sales jumping from 56,000 units in 1998 to over 21 million in 2008,[72] and reaching an estimated fleet of 120 million e-bikes in early 2010.[2][73] This boom was triggered by Chinese local governments' efforts to restrict motorcycles in city centers to avoid traffic disruption and accidents. By late 2009 motorcycles are banned or restricted in over ninety major Chinese cities.[72] Users began replacing traditional bicycles and motorcycles and e-bike became an alternative to commuting by car.[2] Nevertheless, road safety concerns continue as around 2,500 e-bike related deaths were registered in 2007.[73] By late 2009 ten cities had also banned or imposed restrictions on e-bikes on the same grounds as motorcycles. Among these cities were Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Changsha, Foshan, Changzhou, and Dongguang.[72][73]
This bike appears to be sturdily made and the assembly process was not difficult for anyone accustomed to assembly bikes from their state when shipped. Perhaps, it deserves a 5 star rating and if I was seeking a bike for use on sand dunes, I would probably give it 5 stars, I was looking more of an electric motor assisted bicycle than a motor bike and also found the bike, as a bicycle rather heavy and awkward to use as a bicycle with the fat knobby tires.
Direct-to-consumer Italian brand Thok’s MIG bike has reviewers falling at its feet. Why? It simply offers a superb package – its geometry and construction are as on-the-ball as its choice of Shimano motor, battery placement – giving low centre of gravity – and quality build kit. At under £4k, the MIG is great value too (there is also a pricier MIG R, featuring upgraded components). Thok knows its stuff, which is hardly surprising when you look at its founder. Former champion downhill racer Stefano Migliorini understands what makes a good bike, and he personally leads the charge on bike development at Thok.
I really wanted to love this bike, I've only had it a few days, and it's probably too soon for a review, but I can see some issues with the bike. I'll start with the good, it was here 2 days after I ordered it which was amazingly fast shipping, the bike was easy to assemble, very sturdy and high quality looking and feeling, and even came with a nice tool set for assembly and a bell and water bottle, pretty good saddle, and I was very happy with the price, if it performs as I hope it will. Now the bad, as soon as I get a quarter mile from the house my battery indicator light goes from green to yellow, that is way too soon for the battery on a bike with this alleged range to be at "half life?". I have read in other reviews many have the same issue and say that it is just "inaccurate " and to "not pay attention to that" but it is disconcerting to me. Also the bike does not have the power I was expecting, it is truly a "peddle assist" bike, and not a throttler, the bike basically wants you to peddle and works best as you peddle, in fact the motor actually cuts on and off based on you peddling, in addition to cutting on with throttle, don't get me wrong it will power through on throttle alone on a flat surface pretty well, but if you expect not to do much peddling at all, this is not the bike for you. The fit of the bike isn't great for me, I am 6'2 and the fit for me is a bit awkward, ie: the bike is a bit small for me, anyone my height or taller may want to look at other options, and I can't raise the handle bars at all I don't think, although I believe you can change the angle of them. I've only taken it for 3 short rides as of yet and I was reasonably satisfied with the bikes response and power for my needs on these short trips, but I will have to take a few longer rides before I can give a more complete opinion. The bike is an eye catcher and I see people staring at it everywhere which is cool, I will update as long as I continue to own the bike, but I'm still a bit on the fence about it.
So i am 15 years old. I drive to school every single day and go to the gym about 4 times a week. My bike is starting to let me down, and in march i will be 16. I want to go immeadietly for my driver license when i can, so i don’t want to study for so long and get my scooter license and pay a couple of thousand to get one, just to do it all over when i go for my driver license. Do you advise me to get my Ebike now? Or wait until i can get my scooter? And if i should get it, do you advise i build my own? I hear it’s like a pc, since you can get the performance of a 2000 dollar ebike with a 600-800 dollar bike you build yourself. Can Anyone advise me on these grounds?
While in many areas of the country you are allowed to drive mountain electric bikes in urban settings, some local jurisdictions may limit their use as some models reach 28mph exceeding the on road accepted limit of 20mph.  So before you purchase one of these bikes, make sure to check the local laws in your given area.  These bikes are good for many different age groups including teens and adults.
In a parallel hybrid motorized bicycle, such as the aforementioned 1897 invention by Hosea W. Libbey, human and motor inputs are mechanically coupled either in the bottom bracket, the rear wheel, or the front wheel, whereas in a (mechanical) series hybrid cycle, the human and motor inputs are coupled through differential gearing. In an (electronic) series hybrid cycle, human power is converted into electricity and is fed directly into the motor and mostly additional electricity is supplied from a battery.
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