It’s not as far-fetched as it sounds. In Europe, where the e-bike market has exploded, the European Cycling Union announced that it will create a new racing circuit for e-bikes, including e-road and e-mountain bikes, for the 2019 season. Following suit, the UCI said it will include an electric mountain bike competition in the 2019 World Mountain Bike Championships. Yes, there will be a rainbow jersey awarded to the world’s best off-road e-biker.
In addition to the pedal-assist feature, some e-bikes come with a throttle that engages the motor with the press of a button. These belong to a separate class of e-bike that, obviously, doesn’t offer a pure cycling experience; they’re also illegal in some municipalities. Interestingly, Benjamin says, people who aren’t already “cyclists” tend to gravitate toward throttle bikes at first, but then turn around and choose a pedal-assist for their next purchase.
Mountain bikers and their associations (which I used to be a proud member of), should reconsider their anti-eMTB stance, realize there is a need and demand for Type 1 eMTBs, and focus their efforts on keeping trails open for all mountain bikes. Mountain bikers deserve the right to ride more of our public trails than we are currently allowed. I won’t open a can of worms with my strong opinions on where I believe mountain bikes should be allowed, but suffice it to say that we don’t have near enough access as we should.
On the descents, the Commencal felt somewhat one-dimensional, great when up to speed, but with sluggish and less nimble handling hindering its performance in tighter, low-speed technical sections of trail. The Meta Power Race also had the shortest distance range in our head to head testing, another factor which kept this contender off the top step of the podium. That being said, this e-bike was built for charging, no pun intended, so if you're an aggressive rider who lives for eye-watering descents, then this might be the e-MTB for you. Read the full review to find out more about the Commencal Meta Power Race 650B+.

Due to high total weights of over 20 kg, it doesn’t matter whether the scale stops at 21.44 kg or 22.2 kg for a modern eMTB. In our test, the difference between the lightest and the heaviest bike was just under 4 kg. This is not to be ignored… but a little extra weight in the form of functional, reliable componentry is better than an ebike designed and constructed to be as light as possible, at all costs, but which ends up in the workshop more often than on the trail.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
When all was said and done, the Commencal Meta Power Race 650B+ proved to have everyone's favorite e-bike controls. Commencal uses the Shimano Steps E8000 motor and system which features ergonomic thumb shifters, a small but easy to read digital display and a secure and straightforward charging connection. The ergonomic shifter of the Shimano system is better than the electronic buttons found on both the Specialized, HaiBike and Trek. The Commencal's best-in-the-test digital display also proved to be a favorite for its small size and out of the way mounting location, easy to read at-a-glance information, and color-coded support settings information. The HaiBike's Yamaha PW-X motor and system also featured a digital display, but testers thought it was a little too big, displayed too much information, was more challenging to read, and generally felt a little more clunky and less refined than the Shimano system. That Trek Powerfly's Bosch Purion shifter and display unit was easy to read and had a bright screen, but was in a less visible location on the left side of the handlebar. Our Editor's Choice Award winner, the Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fattie scored the lowest in this rating due to the lack of a handlebar mounted display and a less user-friendly charging connection.
All models of the Turbo Levo use a frame made from M5 aluminum alloy, with the motor and removable battery integrated inside. The frame and fork use 148mm (rear) and 110mm (front) spacing. Specialized 6Fattie Purgatory (front) and Ground Control (rear) 3-inch wide tires are laced to 38mm Roval Traverse rims. Rear stays and pivots are beefed up to handle the additional weight (48.5 lbs) and torque, and bridges are added to the stays, over the non-motorized Stumpjumper. The front fork is a RockShox Yari XC with a 15mm thru-axle. The 135mm rear travel is provided by a custom Fox Float Performance DPS shock with automatic sag adjust. 
There's no room for failure in DH. That's why our Demo 8 downhill mountain bikes get right down to business. They're designed to be the fastest bikes on the track, and with a World Cup overall, it's safe to say that we did it right. You'll find 200mm of our FSR suspension, aggressive S3 DH race geometry, asymmetrical frames, and 650b wheels. It's a machine primed to give you maximum control over the gnarliest terrain that the mountain can muster.
On the descents, the Commencal felt somewhat one-dimensional, great when up to speed, but with sluggish and less nimble handling hindering its performance in tighter, low-speed technical sections of trail. The Meta Power Race also had the shortest distance range in our head to head testing, another factor which kept this contender off the top step of the podium. That being said, this e-bike was built for charging, no pun intended, so if you're an aggressive rider who lives for eye-watering descents, then this might be the e-MTB for you. Read the full review to find out more about the Commencal Meta Power Race 650B+.
Just take a look at the Kenevo and you know it wants to go fast. Downhill. And probably destroy every turn it sees. The tank-like aesthetic and aggressive geometry does indeed allude to the bikes intended purpose. If downhills are your thing, the burly Kenevo is your friend: it’ll get you to the top with ease but, once the seat drops, you won’t be able to stop it. There’s not a lot more to be said about it – the best in its class…
The Super Commuter is very aptly named. The 350w Bosch motor will help you sustain speeds of up to 28mph, and the burly, 2.4-inch wide, Schwalbe Super Moto-X 650b tires will keep you secure on even the roughest city streets, and Shimano Deore hydraulic brakes provide ample stopping power. Fenders provide welcome protection from road spray so you arrive at your destination fresh, integrated lights are critical for post-sunset riding, and a side-view mirror hanging on the left side of the handlebar gives a great view of traffic around you. After all, you can ride at the speed of urban traffic on the Super Commuter.
I really wanted to love this bike, I've only had it a few days, and it's probably too soon for a review, but I can see some issues with the bike. I'll start with the good, it was here 2 days after I ordered it which was amazingly fast shipping, the bike was easy to assemble, very sturdy and high quality looking and feeling, and even came with a nice tool set for assembly and a bell and water bottle, pretty good saddle, and I was very happy with the price, if it performs as I hope it will. Now the bad, as soon as I get a quarter mile from the house my battery indicator light goes from green to yellow, that is way too soon for the battery on a bike with this alleged range to be at "half life?". I have read in other reviews many have the same issue and say that it is just "inaccurate " and to "not pay attention to that" but it is disconcerting to me. Also the bike does not have the power I was expecting, it is truly a "peddle assist" bike, and not a throttler, the bike basically wants you to peddle and works best as you peddle, in fact the motor actually cuts on and off based on you peddling, in addition to cutting on with throttle, don't get me wrong it will power through on throttle alone on a flat surface pretty well, but if you expect not to do much peddling at all, this is not the bike for you. The fit of the bike isn't great for me, I am 6'2 and the fit for me is a bit awkward, ie: the bike is a bit small for me, anyone my height or taller may want to look at other options, and I can't raise the handle bars at all I don't think, although I believe you can change the angle of them. I've only taken it for 3 short rides as of yet and I was reasonably satisfied with the bikes response and power for my needs on these short trips, but I will have to take a few longer rides before I can give a more complete opinion. The bike is an eye catcher and I see people staring at it everywhere which is cool, I will update as long as I continue to own the bike, but I'm still a bit on the fence about it.
The Espin is powered by a 350-watt motor that’s rated for trips up to 50 miles (depending on the terrain and assist level). Once depleted, the battery fully charges in roughly five hours. Thankfully, Espin makes it easy to remove the battery, allowing you to quickly recharge it at home or in the office between trips. A backlit LCD control hub displays your basic metrics and battery life while in transit and LED headlights add a touch of light when needed.

And he’s had some fun on a set of lengthy interviews with Joe Rogan, among others. But the pertinent tidbit comes from his recent appearance on Recode, the Silicon valley tech media outlet, now part of the Vox media group. He recapitulated some of his earlier near-death experiences on dirt bikes and motorcycles, effectively answering the question regarding  whether Tesla might make a motorcycle. But then he dropped this little snippet that made two-wheel fans’ ears perk up when asked about whether a Bird competitor might be in the offing:
Whether you're riding in the backcountry or racing enduro, you need a bike that's capable and efficient. After all, to ride 'all mountain' necessitates riding the entire mountain. That's why our Enduro line of all mountain bikes, both in 650b and 29er options, come equipped with loads of travel, lightweight constructions, and geometries that can handle themselves on anything from downhill tracks to stomach-wrenching climbs.
Functioning as their premier product, the HPC Revolution took over two years and five prototypes to get right. What’s left is a hand-welded electric mountain bike made right here in the United States featuring a 6061-T6 aluminum frame that weighs only 13 pounds and power levels upwards of 6,000W making it capable to reach speeds of 60 mph. You’ll also find its 203mm travel RockShox Boxxer World Cup Fork come in handy while off-roading as well as its Magura MT7 quad piston performance brakes when traveling at close to highway speeds.
And he’s had some fun on a set of lengthy interviews with Joe Rogan, among others. But the pertinent tidbit comes from his recent appearance on Recode, the Silicon valley tech media outlet, now part of the Vox media group. He recapitulated some of his earlier near-death experiences on dirt bikes and motorcycles, effectively answering the question regarding  whether Tesla might make a motorcycle. But then he dropped this little snippet that made two-wheel fans’ ears perk up when asked about whether a Bird competitor might be in the offing:
Built by a company that’s made cycling equipment for more than four decades, the Vado feels more like a traditional bicycle than almost any other ebike. Its frame and components have been tuned to provide a familiar experience, making it easy for new and long-time cyclists to jump on and start pedaling. Specialized’s heritage shines through nicely, helping separate itself from the competition in an increasingly crowded ebike market.
E-bike usage worldwide has experienced rapid growth since 1998. In 2016 there were 210 million electric bikes worldwide used daily.[33] It is estimated that there were roughly 120 million e-bikes in China in early 2010, and sales are expanding rapidly in India, the United States of America, Germany, the Netherlands,[2] and Switzerland.[34] A total of 700,000 e-bikes were sold in Europe in 2010, up from 200,000 in 2007 and 500,000 units in 2009.[35]
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